Therapies

What is Autism Movement Therapy?

The brain is an information processing wonder. We process and store information in either long or short term areas of the brain. When we need the information, we retrieve it via a pathway (white brain matter) in the mapping area (gray matter) of the brain. Say you move into a new home. You don’t know where to find the grocery store or other neighborhood establishments. But within a short period of time you’ve found these places and you no longer have to think about the specific directions to get to any kind of theme.

Learning and Playing with Dramatic Arts

“I HATE the cold! Why didn’t I buy that condo in Florida!” blurts out the diminutive 4-year-old. She looks adorable with her contagious smile and beautiful curly blonde hair poking out from underneath the squirrel costume she’s wearing. She seems like any other vivacious 4-year-old but she’s not. She has autism. And she’s having fun while learning very important life skills.

Expressive Arts Therapy

All problem solving is essentially creativity. When I was a behavioral therapist, I was continually challenged to solve the problems of toilet training, introducing letters and animals, giving sounds and words to wants and needs, developing social awareness...life’s lists are endless. I began to find that creativity in the midst of these challenges was my greatest ally. I saw miracles worked through the repetition and consistency of behavioral methods and practices.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy builds on a patient’s strengths and abilities. A therapy program will focus on improving the patient’s functional or educational skills. Therapy sessions may include: initial testing to learn about the patient’s needs, regularly scheduled treatment with a physical therapist to work on mobility skills, strengthening exercises or stretching exercises, teaching your family about the patient’s therapy so practice can be done at home, home visits to see if equipment is needed to make caring for the patient easier.

Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapy’s purpose is to assist clients so they can participate in activities of daily life. Pediatric occupational therapists work in a variety of set- tings and within various systems. Some examples include: pediatric intensive care units, rehabilitation units, private clinics, and schools. Pediatric therapists work with children and young adults who have mental, physical, emotional, and developmental delays.

DIR/FLoor Time: Play Therapy For Children with Autism

Often children who have been derailed by devel-opmental delays like autism present for treatment with very poor or no apparent play skills. There is an equally low level of interest in engaging with play partners. This has led to a pessimistic view by psychiatric clinicians of the play capacities of children with developmental challenges.

Speech and Language Pathology

Speech/Language Pathologists serve special needs children and their parents in a myriad of ways. The earlier the intervention the better the outcome, and the less likely non-verbal habits will develop which will later have to be unlearned. The speech language pathologist focuses on areas of communication that include, but are not limited to: oral motor, speech, language (receptive and expressive), voicing, swallowing and feeding, alternatives to verbal communication, and auditory comprehension skills.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy builds on a patient’s strengths and abilities. A therapy program will focus on improving the patient’s functional or educational skills. Therapy sessions may include: initial testing to learn about the patient’s needs, regularly scheduled treatment with a physical therapist to work on mobility skills, strengthening exercises or stretching exercises, teaching your family about the patient’s therapy so practice can be done at home, home visits to see if equipment is needed to make caring for the patient easier.'

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: The Voice of Success for Your Child

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) leads many children to success in school and life. It is generally associated with electronic speech-generating devices resembling laptop or hand-held computers, which young people may adopt as a primary voice when they are significantly affected by speech deficits related to conditions like cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and traumatic brain injuries.

Expressive Arts Therapy

All problem-solving is essentially creativity. When I was a behavioral therapist, I was continually challenged to solve the problems of toilet training, introducing letters and animals, giving sounds and words to wants and needs, developing social awareness...life’s lists are endless. I began to find that creativity in the midst of these challenges was my greatest ally. I saw miracles worked through the repetition and consistency of behavioral methods and practices.