IEP

Transition Plans Matter

Transition plans are a vital part of an IEP document for any student over the age of sixteen. In California, the state law requires that no later than age sixteen, a student’s IEP must include appropriate, measurable post-secondary goals and transition services needed to assist your child in reaching those goals. Cal.Ed.Code §56345(8)(a).

The Individual Education Plan

Federal and state law mandate a free appropriate public education tailored to the unique needs of the student. Many parents have come to know this free appropriate public education as the painfully traumatic Individual Educational Plan, or IEP. The IEP is the agreement between student and school to help the child get the education to which they are entitled to under the law. All to often the IEP process becomes a nightmare, because the parents do not understand the process and their rights.

The Individual Education Plan

Federal and state law mandate a free appropriate public education tailored to the unique needs of the student. Many parents have come to know this free appropriate public education as the painfully traumatic Individual Educational Plan, or IEP. The IEP is the agreement between student and school to help the child get the education to which they are entitled to under the law. All to often the IEP process becomes a nightmare, because the parents do not understand the process and their rights.

Special Education Advocates

When a parent of a special needs child becomes increasingly frustrated, experiencing roadblocks in their efforts to intercede with their child’s school to access educational supports and services for their child, a consultation with a special education advocate should be considered.

The Importance of Independent Educational Evaluations

Evaluations, also called "assessments" in some states, provide valuable information regarding the nature and extent of your child’s disability as well as the impact the condition may have on his or her education. Strengths and weaknesses identified through this process form the basis for your child’s present levels of performance, or your child’s baseline of functioning in the area of evaluation.

The Role of the Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE)

The IEP Process: What You Need to Know

Beginning at age 3 and throughout your child’s education, if you suspect that your child has special needs, he/she may be eligible for support from the local school district. To determine this, assessments must be conducted, which can be requested by the parent. Once assessed, an IEP (Individualized Education Program) meeting will be held to discuss potential eligibility and appropriate placement/supports.

Three Steps to Better IEP Goals

Clear and measurable goals are the key to a successful IEP. Here are three steps to assure better goals in your child’s IEP.

1.   Understand Your Child’s Current Functioning

IEP or 504 Plan: Which is Right for Your Child?

When a student qualifies for special education, the school district is required to develop an individual education program or “IEP” for the student. The IEP must include the basis for special education eligibility, measurable goals and objectives, the services, accommodations, and/or modifications required to accomplish the goals, and the type of placement, such as regular education, resource, special day class, etc.

Transition Plans Matter

Transition plans are a vital part of an IEP document for any student over the age of sixteen. In California, the state law requires that no later than age sixteen, a student’s IEP must include appropriate, measurable post-secondary goals and transition services needed to assist your child in reaching those goals. [Cal.Ed.Code §56345(8)(a)].

Why and When to Choose a Non-Public School

The “Three R’s” are a well-worn cliché of education, and often the traditional neighborhood school will meet your child’s needs. But if you think your special needs child needs more help than their district school is providing, or the district is not implementing the child’s IEP, or the school is unable to manage your child’s behaviors, perhaps it’s time to think about a non-public school (NPS).